“Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.”

— The Great Gatsby
Hey everyone, we are still desperately looking for an awesome home for this regal kitten. If you know anyone who might be interested in adopting her let me know!

Hey everyone, we are still desperately looking for an awesome home for this regal kitten. If you know anyone who might be interested in adopting her let me know!

What I Read: Stoner by John Williams
God, what a book. A beautiful, devastating, simple and honest look at an average man trying to make his way through life. All at once it’s about academia, choice, love, regret and the invisible forces that are quietly at play in our lives every day.
William Stoner is one of the most subtle, compelling characters that I’ve ever read and even though there are no dramatic fireworks in this book, it left me breathless and near tears by the end.
You know that odd mixture of melancholy and beauty that you get sometimes? When you hear “Landslide” while on a red eye flight or you see a lonely old man wearing corduroy pants sitting on a park bench alone in the autumn, that kind of thing that tears at your heart but also makes you so glad to be alive at the same time? That’s what this book did to me. It’s a celebration of life in many ways, the life of a man who struggled and suffered but also shared moments of love and minor triumph. He didn’t build the pyramids or cure cancer but he was alive damn it. He was here.
There are no clear narrative arcs or plot devices that neatly wrap up the story. It’s messy and subtly gorgeous and full of pain, but I think that’s how life can be and I like when books make me feel that way.
This is one of the most beautiful, saddest books I’ve ever read and probably one of the best books I’ve read this year.

What I Read: Stoner by John Williams

God, what a book. A beautiful, devastating, simple and honest look at an average man trying to make his way through life. All at once it’s about academia, choice, love, regret and the invisible forces that are quietly at play in our lives every day.

William Stoner is one of the most subtle, compelling characters that I’ve ever read and even though there are no dramatic fireworks in this book, it left me breathless and near tears by the end.

You know that odd mixture of melancholy and beauty that you get sometimes? When you hear “Landslide” while on a red eye flight or you see a lonely old man wearing corduroy pants sitting on a park bench alone in the autumn, that kind of thing that tears at your heart but also makes you so glad to be alive at the same time? That’s what this book did to me. It’s a celebration of life in many ways, the life of a man who struggled and suffered but also shared moments of love and minor triumph. He didn’t build the pyramids or cure cancer but he was alive damn it. He was here.

There are no clear narrative arcs or plot devices that neatly wrap up the story. It’s messy and subtly gorgeous and full of pain, but I think that’s how life can be and I like when books make me feel that way.

This is one of the most beautiful, saddest books I’ve ever read and probably one of the best books I’ve read this year.

“He had, in odd ways, given it to every moment of his life, and had perhaps given it most fully when he was unaware of his giving. It was a passion neither of the mind nor of the flesh; rather, it was a force that comprehended them both, as if they were but the matter of love, its specific substance. To a women or to a poem, it said simply: Look! I am alive.”

— From Stoner by John Williams
What I Watched: Edge of Tomorrow

What I Watched: Edge of Tomorrow

Son of a bitch I can’t wait to don a sport coat and go see Alex Ross Perry’s new film LISTEN UP PHILIP.

“A natural component of filmmaking is the struggle to find money. It has been an uphill battle my entire working life… If you want to make a film, go make it. I can’t tell you the number of times I have started shooting a film knowing I didn’t have the money to finish it. I meet people everywhere who complain about money; it’s the ingrained nature of too many filmmakers. But it should be clear to everyone that money has always had certain explicit qualities: it’s stupid and cowardly, slow and unimaginative. The circumstances of funding never just appear; you have to create them yourself, then manipulate them for your own ends. This is the very nature and daily toil of filmmaking. If your project has real substance, ultimately the money will follow you like a common cur in the street with its tail between its legs. There is a German proverb: “Der Teufel scheisst immer auf den grössten Haufen” [“The Devil always shits on the biggest heap”]. So start heaping and have faith. Every time you make a film you should be prepared to descend into Hell and wrestle it from the claws of the Devil himself.”

Werner Herzog peering into my goddamn soul.
What I Watched: The Ghost Writer

What I Watched: The Ghost Writer

Great book title or greatest book title?

Great book title or greatest book title?

What I Watched: Shine A Light

What I Watched: Shine A Light

“That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang,
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs where late the sweet birds sang.”

— From Shakespeare’s Sonnet #73
Truman Capote by Carl Van Vechten

Truman Capote by Carl Van Vechten

“Sometimes, immersed in his books, there would come to him the awareness of all that he did not know, of all that he had not read; and the serenity for which he labored was shattered as he realized the little time he had in life to read so much, to learn what he had to know.”

— I started reading John Williams’ “Stoner” earlier today and obviously am loving it.
Is creepy girlfriend/painting guy making videos now?? My investigation continues.

Is creepy girlfriend/painting guy making videos now?? My investigation continues.