What I Watched: In A Lonely Place and Bad Boys

What I Watched: The Master

I love this video of outtakes so much.

The color palate of Birth is incredible. Virtually the only color that exists in the film is this bright green that occurs on the walls of their home and the velvet couch in their friend’s house. 

Take 14 minutes and watch Stephen Gurewitz’s new short film Life In Between. It’s only 7 minutes long but you’ll want to watch it twice.

“We know it’s insane to make films … yet over and over we step back up to the madness and sign on. We can’t stop; it’s what we do.”

— I love Esther Robinson’s article about how it’s unfortunate that there’s no money in independent film, but too bad, let’s roll up our sleeves and make some cheap movies.
What I Watched: The Darjeeling Limited
My appreciation for this film grows every single time I see it. The script is so, so good and relatively simple when you think about it. Each character has basically one  piece of personal baggage (*wink*) that they bring to the table, as well as the collective family issues of recovering from their father’s death as well as their abandonment by their mother that they’re all coping with. The narrative isn’t that intricate, but the emotional tapestry in the film is.
The script is an incredible balance between gut busting humor and very stark, unsettling tragedy, sometimes transitioning between the two within just a few moments (like the scene when Francis says “Look at these assholes”, immediately followed by the raft rescue and ultimately Peter walking around dazed with the small Indian boy in his arms saying “He’s dead, he’s dead”).
Its sumptuously shot, heartbreakingly tender, and it feels less “high concept” than a lot of his other films. With the exception of the phenomenally expressionistic train dolly shot cum character montage set to “Play With Fire”, the film feels slightly pared down. There aren’t a lot of stylistic flourishes typical of many Wes Anderson’s recent films: stop motion animation, intricate set pieces, huge props. It’s smaller and more intimate,choosing to focus on the claustrophobia and alienation of the Whitman brothers, three men lost in a strange land and lost in their own lives.

What I Watched: The Darjeeling Limited

My appreciation for this film grows every single time I see it. The script is so, so good and relatively simple when you think about it. Each character has basically one  piece of personal baggage (*wink*) that they bring to the table, as well as the collective family issues of recovering from their father’s death as well as their abandonment by their mother that they’re all coping with. The narrative isn’t that intricate, but the emotional tapestry in the film is.

The script is an incredible balance between gut busting humor and very stark, unsettling tragedy, sometimes transitioning between the two within just a few moments (like the scene when Francis says “Look at these assholes”, immediately followed by the raft rescue and ultimately Peter walking around dazed with the small Indian boy in his arms saying “He’s dead, he’s dead”).

Its sumptuously shot, heartbreakingly tender, and it feels less “high concept” than a lot of his other films. With the exception of the phenomenally expressionistic train dolly shot cum character montage set to “Play With Fire”, the film feels slightly pared down. There aren’t a lot of stylistic flourishes typical of many Wes Anderson’s recent films: stop motion animation, intricate set pieces, huge props. It’s smaller and more intimate,choosing to focus on the claustrophobia and alienation of the Whitman brothers, three men lost in a strange land and lost in their own lives.

Revisited one of my favorite music videos today. It’s insane that this doesn’t even have 1,000 views.

Please watch this short film I lovingly made with John Early and then go see his show on Thursday

Go see Onur Tukel’s solo art show The Germans Are Coming! on July 24th from 7-11pm at The Living Gallery in Bushwick. Onur is one of the smartest, most talented and interesting people I’ve ever met and we’re all incredibly lucky that he’s giving us an opportunity to take an intimate peek at his brilliance for an evening.

What I Watched: Meek’s Cutoff

What I Watched: Meek’s Cutoff

“Don’t take any shit if you can possibly help it.”

— One of Richard Ford’s 10 Rules for Writers.

“Beware of rashness, but with energy and sleepless vigilance go forward and give us victories”

— Abraham Lincoln
Very sad to hear about the passing of one of my favorite artists, On Kawara.
One of the more interesting works of his was a series of telegrams he would send to friends every day, the message being simply “I Am Still Alive”. The gravity of the project is made even more profound by the news today.

Very sad to hear about the passing of one of my favorite artists, On Kawara.

One of the more interesting works of his was a series of telegrams he would send to friends every day, the message being simply “I Am Still Alive”. The gravity of the project is made even more profound by the news today.

Watching “Clueless” under the West Side Highway and cutting cheese with a keychain knife on a copy of “How To Win Friends and Influence People”.

Watching “Clueless” under the West Side Highway and cutting cheese with a keychain knife on a copy of “How To Win Friends and Influence People”.